The Cactus Who Wanted to Be a Christmas Tree

Katie loves Christmastime. Getting presents is nice, and playing in the snow with her friends is fun, but what she likes best are all the pretty decorations...

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The Boy Who Could Wiggle His Ears

Learning how to wiggle your ears is really hard. But you can do it if you keep trying. And if you learn to keep trying, no problem is too big. So if you can wiggle your ears, you can do anything!

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Some Poems About Life

(30 Actually) Gems of Wit & Wisdom

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The Mother of the Atomic Bomb

The more I study history, the more I realize how much important information never appears in most textbooks. For example, the role of women. I’ve just stumbled across the story of Lise Meitner, who was born in Vienna, Austria in 1878. She was the¬†second woman¬†to receive a Ph.D. in physics at the University of Vienna.

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Happy National Freedom of Information Day!

I know — virtually every day, week and month has a designation, sometimes multiple designations, to commemorate. That’s why I was not surprised when a friend told me today was National Freedom of Information Day (NFID). Why not? This day comes to us courtesy of nationally syndicated radio talk show host Jim Bohannon. Its purpose

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On Pregnancy

I have been following the recent storyline about an unplanned pregnancy in the clever comic strip For Better or For Worse by Lynn Johnston (https://www.fborfw.com/) through our local newspaper. Of course, I have no idea what it’s like to be “with child.” All I know is the process ranges from sickness to discomfort to very

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Thank Sputnik for GPS

If you don’t believe good ideas can come from anywhere, here is some proof. On October 4, 1957 (when I was nine years old), the USSR launched Sputnik, the world’s first artificial satellite. To say this unexpected breakthrough shook up the U.S. scientific community would be an understatement. Two of those who took notice were

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On Communication

I’m halfway through a long-term substitute teaching job with the special-needs kids, and it’s gotten me to thinking about communication. Specifically, how can you communicate with these students when half are confined to wheelchairs and most are non-verbal? I was discussing this recently with a friend, and she suggested pictures. That’s an obvious solution, but

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The Benefits(?) Of Sarcasm

At the high school where I substitute teach, an English teacher has a poster for the National Sarcasm Society. Their symbol is a jackass and their slogan is “Like We Need Your Support.” Actually, there is a Sarcasm Society (https://www.sarcasmsociety.com/) and there’s plenty of “National Sarcasm Society” merchandise available on Amazon.com. I suppose this can

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Is The Secret To Staying Together Living Apart?

I’m certainly not an expert on relationships, so I’m always open to new ideas. But I was surprised to read “When living apart keeps you together” by Julia Sklar (https://www.curbed.com/2020/2/12/21133847/couples-living-apart-together-lat-benefits). Is this the secret to a healthy union? I have heard of couples separated because of work; a promising career sometimes comes before being together

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The Ultimate Oxymoron – A Living Funeral

Sometimes you have to read a headline twice to fully comprehend it. “‘Living Funerals’ Offer Wake-up Call Without Trauma” by Danae King (https://www.pressreader.com/usa/dayton-daily-news/20200206/281943134876311) is the most recent to catch my attention. Occasionally a funeral for someone believed deceased is a plot device in fiction; I recall the service the town gave Tom Sawyer and his

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