The Cactus Who Wanted to Be a Christmas Tree

Katie loves Christmastime. Getting presents is nice, and playing in the snow with her friends is fun, but what she likes best are all the pretty decorations...

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Sunny and Victor: Best Friends Forever

Bears and rabbits are not supposed to be friends, but the story of how Sunny Bunny and Victor Bear became “best friends forever” is a tale of friendship...

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Some Poems About Life

(30 Actually) Gems of Wit & Wisdom

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Short Story — A Fateful Evening

This is a short story I wrote last year that is also available on the Internet at http://www.bewilderingstories.com/issue571/index.html   A Fateful Evening Hello. Please allow me to introduce myself. I am Fate. Perhaps you have heard of me? Maybe by another name. Some people call me Luck, others Good Fortune. Occasionally it’s Irony. But it’s all

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Why Do People Scream?

We take so much for granted in the world. Like why we scream.  I hadn’t given this a thought until I saw this discussed in a Time magazine news brief. Time reported on new research in the journal Current Biology that suggests hearing a scream may activate the brain’s fear circuitry.  Normally, your brain takes

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A Poem About Apples

Here is an original poem in preparation for Fall —   APPLES Do you like apples?   Johnny Appleseed came to me in a dream and told me to plant apple trees.   (Not really, but it makes more sense this way.)   So I planted three apple trees in my yard.   Now they

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How Koalas Keep Cool

I just got back from a week in sunny Southern California (although it did rain for a day).  I was catching up reading my National Geographic magazines (they’re a good size for airplane trips) and I ran across this in the July 2015 issue — A 2014 study led by University of Melbourne ecologists showed

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What If You Need a New Kidney?

Al Roth is a professor of economics at Stanford, and he was co-winner (with Lloyd Shapley) of the Nobel Prize in Economics in 2012.  An engineer by training, he became an expert on designing markets because in certain situations, money alone can’t solve some problems.  For example, Stanford University doesn’t use supply and demand to

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How Much Do You Know About Money?

I was out shopping Saturday night and I heard a cashier marvel about receiving a $100 bill.  Is that the largest bill in circulation? That piqued my curiosity, and I got on my smart phone.  According to the official website of the U.S. Department of the Treasury (http://www.treasury.gov/resource-center/faqs/Currency/Pages/denominations.aspx),  the denominations of currency now in production are

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A Milestone for the Steam Engine

Mention the steam engine, and most people think of James Watt.  Actually, the steam engine goes back to the 1st century AD —  the earliest known design, the aeolipile, was described by the Greek mathematician and engineer Hero of Alexandria, as recorded in his manuscript Spiritalia seu Pneumatica.  On July 2, 1698, British engineer Thomas Savery was

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Handwriting on the Wall

Today I’ve been going through my mother’s papers (you may recall she died in April) and I found an interesting poem, the kind she liked to tape to the refrigerator door:   Handwriting on the Wall A weary mother returned from the store, Lugging groceries through the kitchen door. Awaiting her arrival was her 8-year-old

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Maybe It’s a Geisha Girl

I have some of my best ideas while running.  (Something to do with more oxygen to the brain, I suppose.)  This weekend I remembered a story from one of my first marathons, although this time it was in the aftermath of a race. I was in the 1984 Honolulu Marathon.  Two nights before, there was

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